United States of America

Street Soccer USA

SSUSA is a registered non-profit organisation that promotes and develops a national network of Sport for Development programs based in social service agencies across the country. SSUSA creates positive community through sports around youth and adults who are homeless, dramatically transforming the context in which participants live from one of isolation and marginalization to one of support and encouragement.

SSUSA organises the Homeless World Cup Team USA, bringing players from 19 cities ranging from California to Washington, D.C. together via the Street Soccer USA Cup.

Organisation Details

Participants

Homeless men and women; young people aged 8-17 living in low income housing developments and family homeless shelters

Locations

Nationwide

Homelessness Statistics

40,000,000

People living in poverty

553,700

People experience homelessness any given night

18,500,000

People living below the poverty line

It was estimated that by the end of 2017, more than 553,700 people were homeless on a single night across the US, according to the Department of Housing and Urban Development. This marked the first rise in seven years. (The figure, however, was still 13% lower than in 2010.) (BBC, 2017). However, unofficial estimates of total homelessness ranged from 1.6 million to 3.5 in 2009 (NCH, 2009).

The implications of the great recession are still felt. An estimated 3.2 million jobs were eliminated, and 1.2 million homes foreclosed upon following during the financial crash between 2007-2009 (Portland State University, 2018).

In September 2017, more than one in every eight Americans were living in poverty (40 million, equal to 12.7% of the population). And almost half of those (18.5 million) were living in deep poverty, with reported family income below one-half of the poverty threshold. (UNHR, 2017).

A study by Portland State University found elderly people and minorities disproportionally affected, stating that technology could result in thousands of low-paid jobs being cut, probably making things even worse (Portland State University, 2018).