Kenya

Vijana Amani Pamoja (VAP)

Vijana Amani Pamoja (VAP) was originally formed as a football club in 2003. It was formed in an area where the prevalence of HIV cases were skyrocketing. The majority of its players had become infected directly or indirectly, loosing either one or both parents to HIV.

The club metamorphosized into a community scheme that uses the power and the popularity of the game of football as a metaphor to fight HIV and was officially registered in 2006.

Today the mission is to integrate social and economic values through football by creating a pro-active healthy environment.

VAP focuses on creating awareness of:

  1. HIV – through Skillz Kenya, a football based curriculum that focuses on both boys and girls
  2. Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) – through the Goal program, which focuses on girls and young women
  3. Employment and Entrepreneurship – through vocational training courses which focuses on graduates of all VAP programs
  4. Maktaba Mtaani – through football and STEM, which focuses on both boys and girls using football to teach and advocate for STEM Education.

Organisation Details

Participants

Skillz Kenya targets both boys and girls aged 11-21 years old.

Maktaba Mtaani targets the same age group and both genders.

Goal program targets girls alone aged 11-21 years old while Employment and Entrepreneurship targets both genders aged 16 years to 25 years.

Locations

VAP uses school fields and community fields around Nairobi for its regular football programs.

Homelessness Statistics

42%
Of the population in Kenya live below the poverty line
250 000
People without homes in Nairobi alone (Street Children, 2014)
300 000
Children are estimated to be living and working in the streets of Kenya (IRIN News, 2007)

About 42% of its population live below the poverty line and they are highly vulnerable to environmental, economic, and social crises.

Additionally, Kenya faces humanitarian crisis due to an influx of refugees – there are over 500,000 refugees from Somalia and 30,000 new arrivals from South Sudan (UNICEF).